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P.K. Wadsworth has been a trusted Cleveland HVAC company for 75 years. We gladly share our expertise and advice to help keep you comfortable all year long through the articles we post here.

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Top 5 Ways To Reduce Dust In The Home

  
  
  

Household dust can be a minor nuisance or a major issue, depending on the severity of the problem. Even if you don't have allergies, dust is a problem that all homeowners have to deal with at some point. Practically speaking, dust can't be completely eliminated, but consider these five tips to reduce it:

  1. eliminate dust for home comfortUpgrade your HVAC filtersThe filters in your furnace and air conditioner can remove a lot of dust and other particles from your air, but the cheap fiberglass filters used in many homes don't do a very good job. Upgrading to high-efficiency filters will catch much more dust and help not only improve air quality, but also system efficiency, longevity and overall performance. NOTE: Do be careful here as you can create other problems by going too far the other way. More efficient filters can over strain your blower and are part of an engineered HVAC system for your home.   
  2. Eliminate dust magnets: One effective way to combat dust is to reduce the number of places where it can hide. Thick carpet, upholstered furniture and heavy drapes can hold a ton of dust. Replacing them with tile or hardwood floors, vinyl or leather furniture, and shades or Venetian blinds will make it much easier to control dust in your home. Changing your bedding weekly and washing it in 130-degree water will also reduce dust as well as kill dust mites. 
  3. Mop, don't sweep: Sweeping doesn't really remove dust; it just moves it around. Mopping is much more effective, either with a traditional mop or a Swiffer-style sweeper. If you do vacuum, use a model with a HEPA style filter so that the vacuuming process catches the majority of the dislodged dust and dirt.  NOTE: It is an interesting exercise to turn on your vacuum cleaner in the dark and shine a powerful light around the discharge to see the amount of dust that it stirs up! 
  4. Dust wisely: No matter how much you reduce the amount of dust in your home, dusting will still be necessary from time to time. The best way to dust is to start high and work your way toward the floor. Reducing clutter and decorative items beforehand will make the job easier. After you finish dusting, vacuum the room to remove dust that has settled on the floor. 
  5. Have your HVAC and ductwork cleaned: A lot of dust and other particles can accumulate in your HVAC system over time. Annual maintenance and cleaning will not only eliminate this buildup, but also boost the efficiency of your system. Air ducts should also be cleaned out periodically depending upon the contents of you home, its location, your life style and of course your medical situation. 

To learn more about ways to reduce dust in the home, contact P.K. Wadsworth Heating & Cooling. We've been serving the Greater Cleveland area since 1936.

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Photo Credit

Paul WadsworthPaul Wadsworth is the President and Owner of P.K. Wadsworth Heating and Cooling. For 37 years, Paul has been providing heating and cooling services to the Greater Cleveland area. P.K. Wadsworth has been a trusted Cleveland HVAC service company for 75 years. The company understand the area's construction and local heating and air conditioning needs. Paul has an MBA from the University of Michigan and a B.S., Industrial Engineering from Purdue University. He's been President of the Cleveland Air Conditioning Contractors of America and a founding member of the local chapter. Paul was born and raised in Cleveland and has been active in the local community. He resides in Cleveland, Ohio with his wife and two sons.

The opinions and statements contained in this article are for general informational purposes only and are not instructions. Only trained, licensed and experienced personnel should attempt installation/repair. The author assumes no liability for the opinions/statements made in this article. Any individual attempting a repair or installation based on this article does so at their own risk of loss.

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